Podcast: Drew Whitworth Introduces Session on Information Inequalities

This is a podcast of a panel session chaired by Dr Andrew Whitworth (Manchester Institute of Education) entitled Information Inequalities: do they exist and are they a problem for Manchester?   This session considers how policies other than strictly ‘education’ policies can impact upon access to informational resources, and thus the learning capacity of communities.
The session opens by presenting a recently-researched map of Manchester’s informational environment (see http://tinyurl.com/manchesterinfolandscape), showing how a range of physical informational resources, such as libraries, tutors, work clubs and youth clubs are distributed across the city, and how this correlates to indices of multiple deprivation. Where no policy framework governs their distribution, as with private tutors, there is an almost complete absence of these in the city’s poorest areas. Read more…

Education As A Public Good: A Digest

Broader approaches to societal development are often harder to “sell” than narrowly focused reforms that try to achieve “one thing at a time”. This may help to explain why the powerful intellectual leadership of Manmohan Singh in bringing about the needed economic reforms in India in 1991 was so concentrated on “liberalization” only, without a corresponding focus on the much needed broadening of social opportunities.
Read more…

The Marketisation of Higher Education

Since the late 1970s the culture of academic life has been transformed by the institutionalisation of the policies of marketisation. Outwardly, universities increasingly model themselves on private and especially public sector corporations. Academic exercises and practices have been gradually displaced by management techniques as departments operate more as cost centres often run by administers recruited from the private and public sector. Read more…

Educational History: The Edinburgh Settlement

The Edinburgh Settlement is a multi-purpose voluntary organisation with a rich history spanning more than 100 years. It is part of the international Settlement movement: a global network of social action centres which work closely with local communities, representing and responding to needs and aspirations, to promote social and environmental justice.

Throughout its long history, the Edinburgh Settlement has been instrumental in many significant initiatives in community development and welfare; with innovations in education, support for people economically or socially disadvantaged; through poverty, disability, racial inequality, health issues and other problems; promotion of community volunteering, fostering of the arts and cultural activities, and the provision of much needed community resources. Read more…